Tag Archives: Trilateral

Juster is no jester – just ask his Trilateral Commission comrades their plans for India

“The Trilateral Commission is a skillful, coordinated effort to seize control and consolidate the four centers of power – political, monetary, intellectual, and ecclesiastical. All this is to be done in the interest of creating a more peaceful, more productive world.”  – Senator Barry Goldwater

If you ever wondered how to feed the alligators in the swamp…

Senior VP of Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) Onkar S. Kanwar (L) shakes hands with US Under Secretary of Commerce Kenneth I. Juster

In February, former globalist Trilateral Commission star Kenneth Juster became a member of the National Security Council. He had to resign from the Trilaterals, because they don’t allow you to have two masters at the same time. In just seconds he went from hugs for fellow traveler Madam Madeleine Jana Korbel Albright to shrugs for alleged swamp drainer Mr. Donald Trump.

Not to be outdone for disappointing his supporters once by appointing Juster to high office, Trump struck again at the beginning of September with a new honor – nomination to be Ambassador to India, a job vacant since January 20. Continue reading →

Trilateral Commission 2017 membership list of who really makes American national & foreign policy

There is no more powerful organization than the Trilateral Commission, founded 40 years ago by Jimmy Carter’s acolyte Zbigniew Brzezinski, along with David Rockefeller, Alan Greenspan, Paul Volcker, Henry Kissinger, Bill Scranton and representatives of the Council on Foreign Relations, Brookings Institute and Harvard University.

Trilaterals have led the way to unfair trade with China and other policies that only benefit huge corporations and investors. Fiscal austerity and privatization goals by the commission have eliminated millions of middle class jobs for Americans and Europeans.

This is the most current complete 2017 membership list:

Trilateral North American Members

*Executive Committee

  • Madeleine K. Albright, Chair, Albright Stonebridge Group, Washington; former U.S Secretary of State
  • Bertrand-Marc Allen, President, Boeing International, Arlington Continue reading →

Who controls the World? Here’s what you need to know about how super companies are connected!

A study by the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich has found that a mere 147 corporations control the world – orchestrating events and controlling governments. Many of their officials are members of the Trilateral Commission, participants in world economic forums and leaders of national governments.

The analysis examined the relations between 43,000 transnational corporations (TNC), and decided that the top 147 mega-corporations had huge power over world events.

James Glattfelder, who directed the Zurich team, said they began with a database listing 37 million companies and investors in the world. They identified 43,060 TNCs and the share ownership linking them. A model of which companies controlled others through shareholding networks, along with each company’s operating revenues, was created to map the structure of economic power.

From the 43,000 TNCs, the study revealed a core of 1,318 companies with interlocking owners. Continue reading →

President Trump should follow example of the original “Swamp Fox” and never hire alligators!

General Francis Marion, known as “The Swamp Fox,” was a Revolutionary officer in the South Carolina Second Regiment, who also led a band of irregular fighters in the back and low-country swamps of South Carolina, fighting the British troops under Lord Cornwallis. He is generally known as the Father of Guerilla Warfare, and is recognized as such at various U.S. War Colleges.

alligatorWhen politicians talk about “draining the swamp”, it immediately brings Marion’s exploits to mind, recalling his determination to struggle in the swamps for our new country, and never compromising – despite immense odds against his small units fighting a disciplined British establishment army.

If you were planning to fight all out – in the Swamp Fox tradition – for free trade, to end internationalism that puts America last, and to bring back jobs to America lost by globalist treaties, would you hire a member of the Trilateral Commission to “coordinate the Administration’s international economic policy and integrate it with national security and foreign policy?” Continue reading →

Trilateral Commission 2016 membership includes the folks who rule America behind the scenes

UPDATES:
Zbigniew Kazimierz Brzeziński, co-founder of Trilateral Commisssion, died May 27, 2017 at age 89.
David Rockefeller died March 20, 2017 – founder of Trilateral Commission – was 101 years old

New 2017 Trilateral Membership List


Bill Clinton was a member in 2005. So was George Soros, George H. W. Bush, Madeleine Albright, Tom Foley, Charles Rangel, Dick Gephardt, Richard Perle, Henry Kissinger, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Dianne Feinstein, Fareed Zakaria, David Gergen, Mort Zuckerman,  Robert McNamara and Lynne Cheney. Plus money experts like David Rockefeller of Chase Bank, Jaimie Dimon of J P Morgan, Martin Feldstein,  Larry Summers, John Thain and Paul Volcker.

epsteinThat 2005 roster even included a pervert, unmasked three years later – Jeffrey Edward Epstein, who worked at Bear Stearns early in his career and then formed his own firm. In 2008, Epstein was convicted of soliciting an underage girl for prostitution, for which he served 13 months in prison.

The Trilateral team divides the world into three groups: North American (120 members), European (170) and Asia-Pacific (200). This year’s meetings were: Continue reading →

Is Melania the victim of a crooked Trump advisor?

One of the dumbest moves a candidate can make is to trust former adversaries or believe their miller15-650x393staff members.

As the Teddy “Scare” Cruz supporters battled yesterday to disrupt the Republican convention, first with the Rules Committee and then by crying about their squishy feelings on television shows anxious to show the GOP has fractures, the last thing you would expect is a mole inside the Trump campaign, a traitor, someone with ingrained hatred and an agenda to defeat the presumptive nominee – no matter what, and hiding like a viper, waiting for the death strike. Continue reading →

The Trilateral Commission – April, 2015, North American membership list, including many very familiar names!

rockefeller

David Rockefeller – “Mr. Trilateral Commission” Photo from pixshark.com

UPDATE: 2016 North American Trilateral Commission list now available here.

Have you ever wondered who were the members of the Trilateral Commission, a group which has been in the forefront of world control conspiracy theories for decades? Corporate heads, government officials in trade and commerce, columnists and publishers are included, along with NGO chiefs. One question is whether public acclaim leads to membership in the commission, or does commission membership lead to opportunities unavailable to the average Joe? Regardless of the answer, the commission’s networking possibilities and possible paths to collusion are vast.

The following are  members as of April, 2015. ( italics emphasis by author) Continue reading →

Trilateral Commission membership – the complete official North America Group roster

This is the most current (August 2009) list of members of the North American Trilateral Commission (TC) and their titles. This group is the source of most Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) philosophical stands on globalization. For example, Sen. Diane Feinstein (D-CA) is a prominent member of CFR and former member of TC. She also is a member of the New Democrat Coalition. This is the official roster, which we received directly from the TC.Senator Barry Goldwater described the organization this way:

“In my view, the Trilateral Commission represents a skillful, coordinated effort to seize control and consolidate the four centers of power: political, monetary, intellectual, and ecclesiastical. All this is to be done in the interest of creating a more peaceful, more productive world community. What the Trilateralists truly intend is the creation of a worldwide economic power superior to the political governments of the nation-states involved. They believe the abundant materialism they propose to create will overwhelm existing differences. As managers and creators of the system they will rule the future.”

Readers of this post will recognize many current and past public officials, including prominent members of the Obama government, as well as past Bush, Clinton, Nixon and Reagan appointees. Where else could you find bedfellows like Condoleezza Rice, Charles Rangel?

NORTH AMERICAN GROUP

Graham Allison, Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; former Dean, John F. Kennedy School of Government; former Special Advisor to the Secretary of Defense under President Ronald Reagan and former Assistant Secretary of Defense under President William Clinton
Richard L. Armitage, President, Armitage International LLC, Washington, DC; former U.S. Deputy Secretary of State
Zoë Baird, President, Markle Foundation, New York, NY
James L. Balsillie, Co-Chief Executive Officer, Research in Motion, Ltd., Waterloo, ON; Chair, Canadian International Council (CIC)
Alan R. Batkin, Vice Chairman, Eton Park Capital Management, New York, NY
Nani Beccalli-Falco, President and Chief Executive Officer, GE International, Brussels, Belgium
C. Fred Bergsten, Director, Peterson Institute for International Economics, Washington, DC; former U.S. Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for International Affairs
Catherine Bertini, Professor of Public Administration, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY; Senior Fellow, Agricultural Development, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; former Under Secretary-General for Management, United Nations; former Executive Director, UN World Food Program.
Robert D. Blackwill, Senior Fellow, The RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA; former Deputy Assistant to President George W. Bush and Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Planning; former Ambassador to India
Herminio Blanco Mendoza, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Soluciones Estratégicas, Mexico City, NL; former Mexican Secretary of Commerce and Industrial Development
Stephen W. Bosworth, U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Policy; Dean, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, Medford, MA; former U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea
David G. Bradley, Chairman, Atlantic Media Company, Washington, DC
Scott Brison, Member of Parliament, House of Commons, Ottawa, ON
Gord Brown, Member of Parliament, House of Commons, Ottawa ON
Harold Brown, Counselor and Trustee, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, DC; former General Partner, Warburg Pincus & Company, New York, NY; former U.S. Secretary of Defense
R. Nicholas Burns, Professor of the Practice of Diplomacy and International Politics, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; former U.S. Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs
Sylvia Mathews Burwell, President, Global Development Programs, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle, WA
Louis C. Camilleri, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Philip Morris International, New York, NY
Raymond Chrétien, Strategic Advisor, Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP, Montreal, QC; Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Center for International Studies of the University of Montreal; former Associate Under-Secretary of State of External Affairs; former Ambassador of Canada to the Congo, Belgium, Mexico, the United States and France
Eliot Cohen, Robert E. Osgood Professor of Strategic Studies, Director of Strategic Studies Program, and Director of Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, The Johns Hopkins University, Washington, DC; former Counselor to the U.S. Secretary of State
William T. Coleman III, Founder, former Chairman and CEO, Cassatt Corporation; Founder, former Chairman and CEO and Member, Board of Directors, BEA Systems, Inc., San Jose, CA
William T. Coleman, Jr., Senior Partner and the Senior Counselor, O’Melveny & Myers, Washington, DC; former U.S. Secretary of Transportation; Lifetime Trustee, Trilateral Commission
Timothy C. Collins, Senior Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer, Ripplewood Holdings, New York, NY
Richard N. Cooper, Maurits C. Boas Professor of International Economics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; former Chairman, U.S. National Intelligence Council; former U.S. Under Secretary of State for Economic Affairs
E. Gerald Corrigan, Chairman, Goldman Sachs Bank USA, New York, NY; former President, Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Lee Cullum, Contributing Columnist, Dallas Morning News; Radio and Television Commentator, Dallas, TX
H. Lawrence Culp, Jr., President and Chief Executive Officer, Danaher Corporation, Washington, DC
Gerald L. Curtis, Burgess Professor of Political Science, Columbia University, New York, NY; Visiting Professor, Waseda University, Tokyo; and former Director, Weatherhead East Asian Institute, Columbia University
Lynn Davis, Director, Washington Office, The RAND Corporation, Arlington, VA; former U.S. Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security
Arthur A. DeFehr, President and Chief Executive Officer, Palliser Furniture, Winnipeg, MB
André Desmarais, President and Co-Chief Executive Officer, Power Corporation of Canada, Montréal, QC; Deputy Chairman, Power Financial Corporation
John M. Deutch, Institute Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA; former Director of Central Intelligence; former U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense
Peter C. Dobell, Founding Director, Parliamentary Centre, Ottawa, ON
Paula J. Dobriansky, Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, and Senior International Affairs and Trade Advisor, Baker & Hostetler, LLP, Washington, DC; former U.S. Under Secretary for Democracy and Global Affairs
Wendy K. Dobson, Professor and Director, Institute for International Business, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON; former Canadian Associate Deputy Minister of Finance
Kenneth M. Duberstein, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, The Duberstein Group, Washington, DC; former Chief of Staff to President Ronald Reagan
William C. Dudley, President and Chief Executive Officer, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, New York, NY
Peggy Dulany, Founder and Chair, Synergos Institute, New York, NY
Robert Eckert, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Mattel, Inc., El Segundo, CA
Jessica P. Einhorn, Dean, Paul Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, The Johns Hopkins University, Washington, DC; former Managing Director for Finance and Resource Mobilization, World Bank
Dianne Feinstein, Member (D-CA), U.S. Senate
Martin S. Feldstein, Member, U.S. President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board; George F. Baker Professor of Economics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; President Emeritus, National Bureau of Economic Research; former Chairman, U.S. President’s Council of Economic Advisors
Roger W. Ferguson, Jr., Member, U.S. President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board; President and Chief Executive Officer, TIAA-CREF, New York, NY; former Vice Chairman, Board of Governors, U.S. Federal Reserve System
Stanley Fischer, Governor of the Bank of Israel, Jerusalem; former President, Citigroup International and Vice Chairman, Citgroup, New York, NY; former First Deputy Managing Director, International Monetary Fund
Richard W. Fisher, President and Chief Executive Officer, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Dallas, TX; former U.S. Deputy Trade Representative
Thomas S. Foley, former U.S. Ambassador to Japan; former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives; former North American Chairman, Trilateral Commission, Washington, DC
Kristin J. Forbes, Associate Professor of International Economics, MIT Sloan School of Management, Cambridge, MA; former Member of the U.S. Council of Economic Advisors
Francis Fukuyama, Bernard L. Schwartz Professor International Political Economy, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, The Johns Hopkins University, Washington, DC
Dionisio Garza, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, ALFA, Garza Garcia, NL
Richard A. Gephardt, Senior Counsel, DLA Piper, Washington, DC; former Member (D-MO), U.S. House of Representatives
David Gergen, Professor of Public Service and Director of the Center for Public Leadership, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; Editor-at-Large, U.S. News and World Report
Francisco Gil-Díaz, Executive President, Telefónica de España-México and Central América, Mexico City, DF
Peter C. Godsoe, retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Scotiabank, Toronto, ON
Donald Gogel, President and Chief Executive Officer, Clayton Dubilier and Rice, New York, NY

Allan E. Gotlieb, Senior Advisor, Bennett Jones LLP, Toronto, ON; Chairman, Sotheby’s, Canada; former Canadian Ambassador to the United States; North American Deputy Chairman, Trilateral Commission
Bill Graham, former Member of Canadian House of Commons; former Minister of Foreign Affairs and former Minister of Defence, Ottawa; Chancellor, Trinity College, University of Toronto; Chair of The Atlantic Council of Canada; Co-Vice Chair of Canadian International Council
Donald E. Graham, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, The Washington Post Company, Washington, DC
Richard N. Haass, President, Council on Foreign Relations, New York, NY; former Director, Policy Planning, U. S. Department of State; former Director of Foreign Policy Studies, The Brookings Institution
James T. Hackett, Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer, Anadarko Petroleum Corp., The Woodlands, TX
John J. Hamre, President, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, DC; former U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense and Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller)
William A. Haseltine, President, William A. Haseltine Foundation for Medical Sciences and the Arts, Washington, DC; Founder and former Chairman and Chief Executive, Human Genome Sciences
Richard F. Haskayne, Board Chairman Emeritus, University of Calgary, AB; past Chairman of the Board of TransCanada Corporation
Carlos Heredia, Economist, Mexico City, DF; Advisor to the Governor of Michoacán
John B. Hess, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Hess Corporation, New York, NY
Carla A. Hills, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Hills & Company, International Consultants, Washington, DC; former U.S. Trade Representative; former U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development
Karen Elliott House, Writer, Princeton, NJ; Adjunct Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; former Senior Vice President, Dow Jones & Company, and Publisher, The Wall Street Journal
Walter Isaacson, President and Chief Executive Officer, The Aspen Institute, Washington DC
Reuben Jeffery III, Senior Advisor, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, DC; former Under Secretary of State for Economic, Energy and Agricultural Affairs
Alejandro Junco de la Vega, President and Director, Grupo Reforma, Monterrey, NL
Robert Kagan, Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Washington, DC
Arnold Kanter, Principal and Founding Member, The Scowcroft Group, Washington, DC; former U.S. Under Secretary of State
Charles R. Kaye, Co-President, Warburg Pincus LLC, New York, NY
Colin Kenney, Member, Canadian Senate, Ottawa, ON
Robert M. Kimmitt, Senior International Counsel, WilmerHale, Washington, DC; former U. S. Deputy Secretary of The Treasury
James Kimsey, President and Executive Director, The Kimsey Foundation, Washington, DC
Henry A. Kissinger, Chairman, Kissinger Associates, Inc., New York, NY; former U.S. Secretary of State; former U.S. Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs; Lifetime Trustee, Trilateral Commission
Michael Klein, former Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer, Citi Markets & Banking; New York, NY
Enrique Krauze, General Director, Editorial Clio Libros y Videos, S.A. de C.V., Mexico City, DF
Robert W. Lane, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Deere & Company, Moline, IL
Fred Langhammer, Chairman, Global Affairs, The Estée Lauder Companies, Inc., New York, NY
Winston Lord, Chairman Emeritus and former Co-Chairman of the Board, International Rescue Committee, New York, NY; former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs; former U.S. Ambassador to China
E. Peter Lougheed, Counsel, Bennett Jones, Barristers & Solicitors, Calgary, AB; former Premier of Alberta
Roy MacLaren, former Canadian Minister; Toronto, ON
John A. MacNaughton, Chairman, Business Development Bank of Canada, and Chairman of Canadian Trading and Quotation System Inc., Toronto, ON
Antonio Madero, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, San Luis Corporacion, S.A. de C.V., Mexico City, DF
John Manley, Counsel, McCarthy Tétrault LLP, Ottawa, ON; former Canadian Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance
Sir Deryck Maughan, Member, KKR & Co.; Head, Global Financial Services Group; New York, NY
Jay Mazur, President Emeritus, UNITE (Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees, and President, ILGWU’s 21st Century Heritage Foundation, New York, NY
Heather Munroe-Blum, Principal and Vice-Chancellor, McGill University, Montreal, QC
John D. Negroponte, Vice Chair, McLarty Associates, Washington, DC; former U.S. Deputy Secretary of State; former U.S. Director of National Intelligence; former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations and former U.S. Ambassador to Iraq
Joseph S. Nye, Jr., University Distinguished Service Professor and former Dean, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; former Chair, National Intelligence Council and former U.S. Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs; North American Chairman, Trilateral Commission
Meghan L. O’Sullivan, Lecturer in Public Policy, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; former Special Assistant to President George W. Bush and Deputy National Security Advisor for Iraq and Afghanistan, National Security Council, The White House
Dinesh Paliwal, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Harman International Industries, Inc., Stamford, CT
Thomas R. Pickering, Vice Chairman, Hills & Company, International Consultants, Washington, DC; former Senior Vice President, International Relations, The Boeing Company, Arlington, VA; former U.S. Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs; former U.S. Ambassador to the Russian Federation, India, Israel, El Salvador, Nigeria, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, and the United Nations
Martha C. Piper, former President and Vice-Chancellor, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC
Richard Plepler, Co-president, HBO, New York, NY
John Podesta, President and Chief Executive Officer, Center for American Progress, Washington, DC; former Chief of Staff to President William J. Clinton
Adam Posen, Deputy Director and Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics, Washington, DC
Gen. Joseph W. Ralston, U.S. Air Force (Ret.), Vice Chairman, The Cohen Group, Washington, DC; former Commander, U.S. European Command, and Supreme Allied Commander NATO; former Vice Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, U.S. Department of Defense
Charles B. Rangel, Member (D-NY), U.S. House of Representatives
Federico Reyes Heroles, Writer and Political Analyst, Chairman of the Board of Este Pais Magazine, and Chairman of the Board, Transparencia Mexicana, Mexico City, DF
Condoleezza Rice, Professor of Political Science, Stanford University, and Thomas and Barbara Stephenson Senior Fellow on Public Policy, Hoover Institution, Palo Alto, CA; former U. S. Secretary of State; former National Security Advisor to President George W. Bush
Hartley Richardson, President, Chief Executive Officer, and Director, James Richardson & Sons, Ltd., Winnipeg, MB
Joseph E. Robert, Jr., Chairman and Chief Executive Office, J.E. Robert Companies, McLean, VA
David Rockefeller, Founder, Honorary Chairman, and Lifetime Trustee, Trilateral Commission, New York, NY
John D. Rockefeller IV, Member (D-WV), U.S. Senate
Kenneth Rogoff, Professor of Economics and Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; former Chief Economist, International Monetary Fund, Washington, DC
Charles Rose, Host of the Charlie Rose Show and Charlie Rose Special Edition, PBS, New York, NY
Irene B. Rosenfeld, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Kraft Foods, Inc., Northfield, IL
David M. Rubenstein, Co-founder and Managing Director, The Carlyle Group, Washington, DC
Luis Rubio, President, Center of Research for Development (CIDAC), Mexico City, DF
Arthur F. Ryan, former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Prudential Financial, Inc., Newark, NJ
Susan Schwab, Professor, Maryland School of Public Policy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD; former U.S. Trade Representative
Hugh Segal, Member, Canadian Senate (Conservative, Ontario); Member, Special Senate Committee on Terrorism; former Chair, Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs; Vice Chair (Research), Canadian International Council; and former President, Institute for Research on Public Policy
Jaime Serra, Chairman, SAI Consulting, Mexico City, DF; former Mexican Minister of Trade and Industry
Susan Shirk, Director, University of California Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation, La Jolla, CA
Dinakar Singh, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, TPG-Axon Capital, New York, NY; former Co-head, Principal Strategies Department, Goldman Sachs
Gordon Smith, Director, Centre for Global Studies, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC
Donald R. Sobey, Chairman Emeritus, Empire Company Ltd., Halifax, NS
Ronald D. Southern, Chairman, ATCO Group, Calgary, AB
Jessica Stern, Academic Director, Program on Terrorism and the Law, Harvard Law School, and Lecturer on Law and Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
Barbara Stymiest, Chief Operating Officer, Royal Bank of Canada, Toronto, ON
John J. Sweeney, President, AFL-CIO, Washington, DC
Strobe Talbott, President, The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC; former U.S. Deputy Secretary of State
Luis Téllez, Chairman, Bolsa Mexicana; former Secretary of Communications and Transportation of Mexico
George J. Tenet, Managing Director, Allen & Company, New York, NY; former U.S. Director of Central Intelligence
G. Richard Thoman, Managing Partner, Corporate Perspectives and Adjunct Professor, Columbia University, New York, NY; former President and Chief Executive Officer, Xerox Corporation; former Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, IBM Corporation
Frances Fragos Townsend, Partner, Baker Botts L.L.P., Washington, DC; CNN National Security Contributor; former Assistant to President George W. Bush for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism and Chair, Homeland Security Council
Paul A. Volcker, Chairman, President’s Economic Recovery Advisory Board; former Chairman, Wolfensohn & Co., Inc., New York; Frederick H. Schultz Professor Emeritus, International Economic Policy, Princeton University; former Chairman, Board of Governors, U.S. Federal Reserve System; Honorary North American Chairman and former North American Chairman, Trilateral Commission
David Walker, President and CEO, Peter G. Peterson Foundation, New York, NY
R. Keith Walton, Chief Adminstrative Officer, Global Infrastructure Partners, New York, NY
William H. Webster, Senior Partner, Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy LLP, Washington, DC; former U.S. Director of Central Intelligence; former Director, U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation; former Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit
Lorenzo H. Zambrano, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, CEMEX, Monterrey, NL; North American Deputy Chairman, Trilateral Commission
Ernesto Zedillo, Director, Yale Center for the Study of Globalization, Yale University, New Haven, CT; former President of Mexico
Philip Zelikow, White Burkett Miller Professor of History, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; former Counselor, U.S. Department of State; former Executive Director, National Commission on Terrorist Attacks upon the United States (“9/11 Commission”)
Mortimer B. Zuckerman, Chairman and Editor-in-Chief, U.S. News & World Report, and Publisher, New York Daily News; Founder and Chairman of Boston Properties, Inc.; New York, NY

Former Members in Public Service

Adm. Dennis B. Blair, U.S. Director of National Intelligence
Stephen Bosworth, U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Policy*
Lael Brainard, Under Secretary for International Affairs, U.S. Department of the Treasury
Kurt Campbell, Assistant Secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, U.S. State Department
Thomas E. Donilon, U.S. Deputy National Security Advisor
Diana Farrell, Deputy Director, National Economic Council, and Deputy Assistant to the President for Economic Policy, The White House
Michael B. G. Froman, Deputy Assistant to the President for National Security and Economic Policy, The White House
Timothy F. Geithner, U.S. Secretary of The Treasury
Richard Holbrooke, U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan
Gen. James L. Jones, U.S. National Security Advisor
Steven Koonin, Under Secretary for Science, U.S. Department of Energy
Susan E. Rice, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations
Dennis Ross, Senior Advisor, National Security Council
Anne-Marie Slaughter, Director of Policy Planning, U. S. Department of State
James B. Steinberg, U.S. Deputy Secretary of State
Lawrence H. Summers, Director, National Economic Council, The White House
Robert B. Zoellick, President, World Bank

Conclusion – Trilateral and Kissinger

The following excerpt is the conclusion of a recent speech by Henry Kissinger to the Trilateral Commission. Part two was yesterday.

THE TRILATERAL COMMISSION
2009 PLENARYMEETING – TOKYO, JAPAN, APRIL 26, 2009
THE INTELLECTUAL UNDERPINNINGS OF THE TRILATERAL PARTNERSHIP IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Henry Kissinger:

So, it is an enterprise that must be undertaken, but it is an enterprise also that needs to be looked at or studied in the excruciating detail that it involves. It is not something that you can achieve with placards or in outbursts of pacifism. It is because when you ask yourself of the impact on the world of the reduction of nuclear weapons, each phase of this has its own aspects and each phase will lead to a very complicated political discussion.

I have been very much engaged in putting Russian-American relations on a new basis. In dealing with Russian strategists one learns that the notion we had in the 1970s of a Russia with unlimited reserves of manpower, threatening Europe militarily with its conventional force, that had to be opposed with nuclear weapons on the ground is totally reversed. It is Russia today that thinks that it is surrounded by countries with unlimited reserves of manpower and unlimited ideological commitment and that it, therefore, had its own necessities for nuclear weapons which cannot be simply analyzed in terms of the overall deterrence of the United States and Russian equation.

The issue of nuclear weapons has similarities to the Schleswig-Holstein Question in the 19th century, about which Lord Palmerston said there were only three people who had ever understood it: one was dead, the second was in a lunatic asylum, and he himself was the third and he had forgotten all about it. We have to be the third on this issue and we have to learn about it. This is one of the great challenges before us.

All of us here have been affected by the rise of China, and it has been an explicit and an unspoken aspect of many of our discussions. It has never happened before that a country of such magnitude entered the international system without conflict and yet this is precisely the challenge that our international order faces.

There are two aspects to this. One is, What is Chinese policy? Is it Chinese military policy to dominate the region? This is something one can affect, and must affect, by discussions. The second is the weight of China. Regardless of the intentions of Chinese leaders, the weight of China will increase. It is inevitable; it is a fact of life; and it must, therefore, be considered in any discussions we have about a new international system.

This requires, on the side of China, wisdom and restraint, and it requires, on the side of its surrounding countries, comparable wisdom and restraint. Looked at from this point of view, no conversation in the world today is more important than the American and Chinese strategic dialogue.

This does not derogate from any of our alliances; it is not a way of governing the world. Quite the contrary, it is a dialogue that makes it possible to create a multipolar world based on the recognition by two of the countries that are the principal carriers of international economic and strategic power of the role that they must play in this.

So what we need to think about is this. What matters can only be done, or can best be done, on a global basis? What matters should be done on a regional basis? What issues require specific, limited groupings to deal with them?

This afternoon, we have heard about the issue of Afghanistan, and that issue and the Pakistan issue involve, really, two problems. One is the traditional military problem of how do you deal with the challenge to order that has presented itself. But secondly, there is the necessity of creating a political system in the region that enables all of the countries that are potentially affected by this to act in a unified manner over an extended period of time.

On this we could find that India, China, Russia, Iran, and the United States have parallel objectives, and the challenge will be, first of all, to define these objectives to ourselves in a way that can be translated into action and, secondly, to use the combined pressures that they can exercise to diminish the purely American military aspect of it and merge it into this international system.

In a deep way, this is exactly the problem we face also with respect to North Korea and Iran. Whatever the debate is about the military significance of their weapons, the fact is that we have a situation in which the international community has expressed its determination that there not be nuclear weapons programs in those countries. If they now occur anyway, how can one then still speak of a meaningful international consensus? Of course, there could be a negotiation to achieve this.

Having described all of these complexities, let me leave us with a positive feeling. First, the international financial crisis can help the creation of an international political order for a negative reason. Every country is so preoccupied with its own domestic issues; no country has a great surplus of resources that it can devote to international adventures. So, if political leadership can develop, this is a good objective circumstance.

Secondly, we are living in a period in which, for the first time that I know of, no major country is challenging the international system. All of the challenges to the international system come from countries that, in relation to the overall order, are relatively fringe countries or from non-state actors. So, the opportunities that we can see in developing the global patterns that are inherent in this situation are very great despite the fact that the surface knowledge is the opposite.

To all of this I think this Trilateral Commission can make a significant intellectual contribution. It can raise issues; it can define them in a long-range point of view; and it can help with one of the great needs of this period, which is that governments are so preoccupied with the immediate issues that there is sometimes no focal point for a consistent application of long-range visions.

So we can raise issues, we can indicate directions, and in this way we can fulfill the vision that created the Trilateral Commission when it operated in a smaller framework and when one of its primary purposes was to bring Japan into a North Atlantic framework. Now it can help bring Asia and Russia into a coherent global framework.

Henry A. Kissinger is Chairman, Kissinger Associates, Inc., New York, NY; former U.S. Secretary of State; former U.S. Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs; and Lifetime Trustee, Trilateral Commission

Kissinger and Trilateral Commission – Part 2

The following excerpt is Part 2 of a recent speech by Henry Kissinger to the Trilateral Commission is fascinating. Part one was yesterday. Tomorrow’s post will be a continuation.

THE TRILATERAL COMMISSION
2009 PLENARYMEETING – TOKYO, JAPAN, APRIL 26, 2009
THE INTELLECTUAL UNDERPINNINGS OF THE TRILATERAL PARTNERSHIP IN THE 21ST CENTURY

Dr. Henry Kissinger

Therefore, some of the disagreements that have existed between Europe and the United States are not due primarily to the personality of American leaders, though they were not aided by some of the arguments that the American leaders made. Their fundamental cause is the fact that European public opinion is very reluctant to engage in foreign policy beyond soft power. It is not a lack of loyalty to the alliance; it is not a lack of understanding of what the issues are; it is the fact that in Europe, the nation-state—based on its experience in two world wars—cannot conduct a strategic foreign policy involving significant sacrifices, and the European Union has not yet substituted a political concept.

Therefore, a wise policy will keep that in mind, and I believe the Obama administration has acted wisely in Afghanistan in not making an issue of the disparity between the formal NATO commitment and the willingness of the Europeans to support it. I would prefer a different attitude, but I think that if we push that issue, we will weaken our relationship. And in a more fundamental way, as we think of the way the international order is likely to evolve, we need to understand what Europe can and cannot do and how the North Atlantic alliance needs to be defined to fit the current circumstances.

In other parts of the world, the notion of sovereignty has also collapsed, but for quite different reasons. In the Islamic world, particularly in the Middle East, the notion of a sovereign state conducting an autonomous foreign policy was brought in at the end of World War I by the European countries. It, therefore, has not ever, and certainly does not now, attracted the loyalties that the European nation-state had at its fully developed period. What has emerged is a concept of Islamism that challenges the notion of the secular state and, in some cases, the existence of the actual states.

The principal country in that area that is conducting a traditional foreign policy in some respects is Iran because it has the tradition of an empire. It has had a national identity, but it is now using it, at least in part, to support the Islamic movements that undermine the secular state.

The principal place where the traditional international system still exists in its more or less pure form is in Asia. The nations of Asia have the kind of national loyalties that were characteristic of the European states. Strategic conflict between the European states is practically inconceivable. In Asia, war is highly unlikely, but there is a tendency to consider each other as potential strategic adversaries. At any rate, a balancing of power of the various states is always in the back of their minds.

So, as the center of gravity of international affairs moves to the Pacific and to the Indian Ocean, there are, in a way, two somewhat contradictory approaches to international affairs that are being conducted, and, if other conditions had not changed, one would predict for Asia some of the kinds of conflicts that existed previously in the evolution of European history.

The reason that conflict is not likely is the emergence of global issues that can only be dealt with on a global basis—issues like climate, the environment, energy, trade, weapons of mass destruction—and they impel a global approach. And there is another element. The nations of Europe went to war with each other because they thought the consequences of defeat were worse than the consequences of war.

Nobody with modern weapons can have any illusions that the consequences of war will not have the most drastic impact on modern societies. And so, the rise of Asia has to be accommodated in an international system that is based on cooperation and on dialogue without the recourse to military measures that used to dominate international affairs.

But that raises the question of how does one do this? In history, international orders emerged either by consensus or by some application of a balance of power. Now, ideally, one would like to see order emerge out of consensus. But history teaches, and our own experience teaches us, that in groups based on consensus there is very often an unequal willingness to assume risks and, therefore, leadership groups emerge within the consensus group that assume responsibility, or the whole thing will gradually stagnate and fall apart.

But then, the question arises, how does one apply this in the multipolar world that I have described? How can one get either consensus or equilibrium when the various actors are states but they can also be NGOs and they can also be non-state groups. This is the challenge of our time, and this is where a group like this can be of great importance. This group can raise questions that the governments sometimes do not find it possible to address, and it can provide a possible consensus to which governments can repair or which they can use as they make their decisions.

This applies to a number of issues. Let me give one example that was raised by President Obama in Prague, the issue of a world without nuclear weapons. That is a goal every American president has avowed since the beginning of the nuclear age and it has attracted enormous support and been supported by any number of intellectual groups. But the fact is that as a practical matter it is extraordinarily difficult to reach and, in fact, impossible to reach under present circumstances.

At the Munich Security Conference, I quoted Senator Sam Nunn, who is a colleague of mine, on having talked about this project, together with George Shultz and Bill Perry. Senator Nunn puts it this way: “The project is like trying to climb a mountain that is covered in clouds. And you announce that you want to reach the summit but you have no idea what the summit looks like.

On the other hand, you will never understand what the summit looks like until you begin the journey and start going into the clouds, and in that process it may become clearer to you. In fact, you cannot do it unless you undertake that journey.” Now the reason I and others who have been in my office and who were known as hardliners have cooperated in this project is that we have all had the experience of asking ourselves, “What would we do if we had to make the decision to use nuclear weapons?”

Each of us understood that this was a decision of a magnitude that goes beyond anything in previous political experience and probably of a magnitude that can have no moral justification.

(continued tomorrow)

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