Category Archives: public school

American teachers competing for jobs against J-1 foreigners, who get low wages, pay no FICA taxes

Glendale, known as “Arizona’s Antique Capital” and home to the Arizona Cardinals of the NFL, has a problem.

The city doesn’t like paying its elementary public school teachers a decent wage.

With a Master’s degree annual teacher’s base pay is only $41,007. Ph.Ds earn just $1,000 more!

Boasting a  median family income of $51,162, Glendale is no inner city ghetto facing falling taxes and urban rot, but its Pendergast Elementary School District in 2014 decided to pay its teachers about $10,000 a year less than the national average, despite the high local cost of living. Continue reading →

Call Me “irresponsible, unreliable, throw in undependable”; but don’t call me “deplorable”

Hillary, Hillary, Hillary…can we still love you when you call us names? And for me, the question is: am I in the “desperate” bucket or the “deplorable” basket, just because I won’t vote for you?

A little background is in order. Continue reading →

A Philadelphia public school that beat the preps and the 1940 NYPD class that excelled with no legacies

Every high school class has organizers, those busy, enthusiastic souls who run for student council, plan proms and after they graduate, are drawn to suggesting alumni events. The latest test for me to remember classmate names was on Saturday night at Central High School’s 211th class’ 75th member birthday party.

The original graduating class in 1959 had some 210 students; 46 have died. Ours was not the most remarkable class in the school’s history. A list of notable graduates from all classes is here.

In fact, it was good that some of the 211th weren’t there – Rev. Jeremy Wright, for example, who was rebuked by President Barack Obama. Or Kermit Gosnell, an abortion doctor, justly serving time for hideous acts.

There were special moments. Standing together for a class picture, Classmate Richard Donald Smith, who is blind, entertaining with a flute rendition of our school song. It was that kind of night.

Central was an all boys, public high school in Philadelphia, when I attended. There was a brutal entrance exam, also known as an I.Q. test, and the minimum score was 115, and the average was 125. There were 15 other public highs and 16 Catholic high schools in the city, all of them easier and more fun. We went to Central because our parents “suggested” we compete for entrance, and so we braced ourselves. Continue reading →

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