Category Archives: middle class

How the “free market” in toilet tissue tricked you

Sometimes you have to cringe when a Capitalism fan praises the wonder of the “free market.”

For example, “free market competition lowers prices…”

Sounds great, but visit a store and compare the price of batteries from various companies – each one is within a penny of the other.

Listen to the CEO of a major airline who explains: “we no longer compete on price because that’s bad for profits for the entire industry.”

Or, be amazed when the generic drug you are prescribed is made by the same manufacturer as the brand name version and the price of both is nearly identical.

Ah…the “free” market. Some politicians salute this as the cure for rising middle class healthcare costs. Is medical services shopping fun as you put your heart attack on pause to consult with various institutions and learn they have no set price, just schedules of charges that all fall within a close range? Continue reading →

Fake news portrays American Blacks as lower class, victims in desperate need of help from politicians

Are most American Blacks struggling to someday be as successful as the average White?

If you watch the mainstream media, listen to college professors or pay attention to politicians, you might conclude that Blacks in America are in deep trouble.

The most common fake news is that nearly all Blacks have been denied entry into the middle class for a variety of reasons, and experts (mostly White) are needed to solve this problem.

Endless hours are spent on talk shows and in classrooms arguing about what are the correct solutions to this alleged rampant inequality problem. White privilege is blamed. Slavery is cited. Reparations are urged. The whole country is in a frenzy about Blacks and the middle class. Continue reading →

A Philadelphia public school that beat the preps and the 1940 NYPD class that excelled with no legacies

Every high school class has organizers, those busy, enthusiastic souls who run for student council, plan proms and after they graduate, are drawn to suggesting alumni events. The latest test for me to remember classmate names was on Saturday night at Central High School’s 211th class’ 75th member birthday party.

The original graduating class in 1959 had some 210 students; 46 have died. Ours was not the most remarkable class in the school’s history. A list of notable graduates from all classes is here.

In fact, it was good that some of the 211th weren’t there – Rev. Jeremy Wright, for example, who was rebuked by President Barack Obama. Or Kermit Gosnell, an abortion doctor, justly serving time for hideous acts.

There were special moments. Standing together for a class picture, Classmate Richard Donald Smith, who is blind, entertaining with a flute rendition of our school song. It was that kind of night.

Central was an all boys, public high school in Philadelphia, when I attended. There was a brutal entrance exam, also known as an I.Q. test, and the minimum score was 115, and the average was 125. There were 15 other public highs and 16 Catholic high schools in the city, all of them easier and more fun. We went to Central because our parents “suggested” we compete for entrance, and so we braced ourselves. Continue reading →

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