Trilateral Commission turned China into giant technocracy to serve investors and corporations

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang (R), Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (L) and South Korean President Park Geun-hye attend the sixth China-Japan-South Korea leaders’ meeting in the South Korean capital of Seoul, Nov. 1, 2015. (Xinhua/Liu Weibing)

Zbigniew Brzezinski, co-founder of the Trilateral Commission, died Friday.

He was responsible for most of America’s economic woes today caused by our monstrous foreign trade deficit, fortunes and lives lost in Afghanistan, trillions wasted in the Cold War.

Brzens

Leading the Trilateral effort, Brzezinski became National Security Advisor for President James Carter, and in May 1978, against State Department wishes, began talks that led to full diplomatic relations in December that year.

Brzezinski’s “nor­mal­iza­tion” of rela­tions with Com­mu­nist China was designed to change it tech­no­log­i­cally into a super power.

The following year the Washington Post reports in a February article – China Policy: A Born-Again Brzezinski – how Zbigniew describes his meeting with Cyrus Vance and China’s leader, Deng Xiaoping (Teng):

FEBRUARY 1979 — The eyes sparkle with excite­ment even days later. The arms erupt in sudden sweeping ges­tures when he talks about it. And that causes the photos — about a dozen of them — to fly out of Zbig­niew Brzezinski’s hands and scatter over the floor of his office as he is speaking.

“Here’s Cy… and here I am… and there is Teng right between us.… ”

Brzezinski is talking in that quick. clipped, excited style that is his way, and he is pointing at one photo that remains in his hand while he bends to scoop up the rest, talking all the while.

“It’s amazing, when you think of it. The leader of a bil­lion people — having dinner in my house just two hours after he arrived in this country!

“I mean, it really is rather amazing!”

Tri­lat­er­alist Kiichiro Kitaura, Chairman of Numuru Secu­ri­ties Com­pany, Ltd., was the main speaker at that February confab. He proposed the group attempt to inter­na­tion­alize the yen,  push coop­er­a­tion between Japanese and Amer­ican busi­nessmen on ways to pen­e­trate the Chi­nese market, and “blend” Japanese and Amer­ican technology.

Kitaura also agreed with fellow Tri­lat­er­alist Philip Trezise (from Brook­ings Insti­tu­tion) that Japan’s large cur­rent account sur­plus should be invested abroad and not in Japan. Trezise was backed by another Amer­ican Tri­lat­er­alist, Peter G. Peterson, Chairman of Lehman Brothers, Kuhn Loeb, Inc., who, like Kitaura, urged more Japanese trade.

Peterson later retired from Wall Street to lead the effort to ultimately eliminate Medicare and Social Security by first privatizing them. He has spent about a billion dollars on propaganda, including efforts such as Fix the Debt  and the Fiscal Times.

Some may suggest that the path to this open door China policy was first initiated by President Richard Nixon. However, most of the credit for that policy belonged to Henry Kissinger, a major player in the Trilateral Commission.

In  June 2001, a revealing Time Mag­a­zine article Made in China: The Revenge of the Nerds  said that nation had been con­verted into a Tech­noc­racy! Author Kaiser Kuo explained:

The nerds are run­ning the show in today’s China. In the twenty years since Deng Xiaoping’s  reforms kicked in, the com­po­si­tion of the Chi­nese lead­er­ship has shifted markedly in favor of tech­nocrats. …It’s no exag­ger­a­tion to describe the cur­rent regime as a tech­noc­racy.

After the Maoist mad­ness abated and Deng Xiaoping inau­gu­rated the opening and reforms that began in late 1978, sci­en­tific and tech­nical intel­lec­tuals were among the first to be reha­bil­i­tated. Real­izing that they were the key to the Four Mod­ern­iza­tions embraced by the reformers, con­certed efforts were made to bring the “experts” back into the fold.

During the 1980s, tech­noc­racy as a con­cept was much talked about, espe­cially in the con­text of so-called “Neo-Authoritarianism” — the prin­ciple at the heart of the “Asian Devel­op­mental Model” that South Korea, Sin­ga­pore, and Taiwan had pur­sued with apparent suc­cess. The basic beliefs and assump­tions of the tech­nocrats were laid out quite plainly: Social and eco­nomic prob­lems were akin to engi­neering prob­lems and could be under­stood, addressed, and even­tu­ally solved as such.

Other influential Commission members have included familiar names: George H. W. Bush, Dick and Lynne Cheney, Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Jimmy Carter, Walter Mondale, David Rockefeller, David Gergen, Richard Holbrooke, Madeleine Albright, Robert McNamara, Paul Volcker, Alan Greenspan and Paul Wolfowitz, plus US Senators Diane Feinstein, Robert Taft Jr., Charles Robb, William Cohen and John Glenn.

Complete list of Trilateral members worldwide

3 responses

  1. […] is no more powerful organization than the Trilateral Commission, founded 40 years ago by Jimmy Carter’s acolyte Zbigniew Brzezinski, along with David […]

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